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Cheeseguy  


Simmania Junkie!
Simmania Junkie!
Sometimes I have weird feelings, but I don't know if they are real.
Now mine were really little, but they sometimes were a tad creepy..

Forgot what age I was, but I was laying in bed. My door was open. A huge red and white splotch was on the door. It looked like it was moving. Then I blinked. It was then gone.

A few times I have seen the silhouette of a man leaning on my door frame. Was short, probably 4 foot 5. He would stand there. I would blink a few times and he would still be there. Once I saw the guy move. Then I thought it was just my eyes. Closed my eyes and tried to go to sleep. Minute after that, I sensed someone or something was standing at the side of my bed. I opened my eyes, saw the silhouette standing right by my bed, looking right at me.

A few times, I have heard some one call my name. And this would happen when I was doing anything. Laying in bed, in the backyard, anywhere. Most of the time I think of it as nothing though.

Also on occasion I'll see things, balls of colored light, or moving shadows moving around the ceiling or walls.

Now this is more of a dream I had, but it scared me half to death.

I was in the living room with my mom. Saw what looked like a dim glow of light in the kitchen. Thought it was nothing. Next, I see this huge silhouette of something in the backyard. Then that light got larger, and larger, and larger, until it was the size of the fridge. Then this silhouette comes to the back door and makes noises (forgot what they were) Next thing you know I am suddenly running TOWARDS this (by now) gigantic ball of light. It sucked me in. I woke up scared stiff.

Also when I think about these, I sometimes get creeped out. Sometimes I won't dare move, other times it'll just be a slight feeling.

Now share your's (if any)

Blake  

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I think that some of this is pretty normal. Sometimes my eyes just have black/white images burned in for like 45 seconds. I think that's pretty normal.

As far as hearing my name? I have that problem a lot. I've learned to ignore it. It's just hard when someone really is calling my name. I'm often able to tell when it's real or not, but at times I make a mistake there. lol!

I've only hallucinated twice in my life. The first time it scared me like mad. The other time it was probably a result of me just being confused. I don't struggle with any of this as much as I used to. I've been improving mentally. It goes to show that mental problems can heal.

These things probably aren't real. It's just your mind playing with you. (People with OCD have to learn that the hard way, LOL).

Cheeseguy  


Simmania Junkie!
Simmania Junkie!
What's the hard way?

And this people calling my name don't seem like people. And it also sounds like it is coming from the sky, corner of the room, or wutever.

This one didn't scare me, but it kinda creeped me out.

I was laying in bed and my bed shook slightly. Then I almost swore something was standing next to my bed. And that feeling didn't go away until I fell asleep 30 minutes later.

Blake  

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People with OCD tend to have problems thinking that thoughts like these are just their minds playing games with them. They feel as if this is abnormal, and most people don't struggle with them.

The reality, however, is that everyone struggles with intrusive thoughts to some degree. The difference between people with OCD and people without it is in how they respond to these thoughts?

Now is this difference in response a result in mental disability? Not really. It's just faulty thinking. People with OCD need to understand what to think of these thoughts. That's all.

For example, a man without OCD walks into a dairy store. A man with OCD walks in at the same time at another dairy in the city. Both of them suddenly have the same thought at the same time -- they wonder if the employee's hands are contaminated with some terrible germ.

The one without OCD thinks to himself "Oh, well, it's probably just my mind playing games with me. So what? I'm not too worried about it". This one leaves it at that and continues with what he was doing, and gets the meat that he intended to get in the first place.

The one with OCD thinks something like this:

"What if that guy's hands are contaminated? I could get sick! I could die, and maybe my family would die too. Maybe the whole city would get sick and everyone would hate me! Oh no! I can't let this happen!...."

He then leaves the dairy without buying anything and washes his hands about twelve times to make sure that no germs got on his hands.



The problem is clearly in how people respond to these thoughts. It isn't the thoughts themselves.

Those with OCD might be wondering how they can get free from this. Much of it is actually learning to ignore the thoughts.

Let me give an example:

Let's suppose that you are afraid of germs. (I'm using germs as an example. Different people with OCD might have completely different fears altogether. You can still use the same concept. ) You wash your hands after touching anything (or maybe even before touching things too). You are afraid of both spreading and contracting germs.

Well, it might sound odd, but you should touch something that you feel might be contaminated. I'm aren't talking about reaching down into a sewer line. That's something even people without OCD would worry about. I'm rather talking about something like using the restroom without washing hands.

Something that is really important is not to wash your hands, though. (I know I already said that, but this is important) If you go to wash your hands, you are destroying the whole point altogether. The whole point is to make yourself feel uneasy. The anxiety should subside in less than an hour. Then go back and try something harder.

I can't necessarily explain how to get over OCD in one post like this, but one book that I would strongly recommend is "Getting Over OCD: A 10-Step Workbook for Taking Back Your Life" (Jonathan Abramowitz). In this book, Abramowitz walks through all of this stuff in detail.



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